If the visiting cat perceives your porch as risky or hostile, the cat will not want to visit anymore. This tactic is one that the cat won’t associate with you. If the cat thinks you’re causing the hostility, this might not solve the problem. For example, if you shout at the cat each time he is around, he will learn to wait until you are not around, and then he will come to pee on your porch.

He associates the punishment with you instead of the porch. Therefore, the cat will avoid you but will visit when you’re not around. Encourage your neighbors to neuter their cats. No amount of deterrents is going to bring the problem under control until the neighborhood cats are neutered. Both male and female cats often urinate on your porch to advertise that they are sexually available to other cats. Talk with your neighbors to see if they will agree to neutering their cats.

You should positively identify your neighbor’s cat before talking to your neighbor. Watch for the offending cat by either watching through the window or setting up a security camera. Rule out your cat by trying fluorescein dye. Fluorescein is a harmless orange dye that, when ingested, turns urine bright green, and it fluoresces when illuminated with an ultraviolet light. Get fluorescein dye from your vet and add some of the dye to your cat’s food. After a day or two, inspect the areas on your porch where there is urine. Try this at night and shine a black light on the porch.

If you see something fluorescent, your cat is the likely culprit, instead of your neighbor’s cat. Contact an organization to have stray cats neutered. If you have a population of strays in the neighborhood, chances are they won’t be neutered. There are numerous charitable organizations which are geared towards trapping and neutering stray cat populations. Search the internet for an organization near you. You can also contact your local veterinarian. Chances are the clinic undertakes neutering at a discounted rate for any nearby charities.

The vet can usually give you contact details for a local charity coordinator. Remove food from the porch. Neighborhood cats be attracted to your porch by food left out for wildlife or your own pet. Other cats will grow accustomed to finding food here, and they may mark the area with urine. Remove the food so there is no longer a benefit to claiming your porch. Remove potted plants from the porch. Some cats are attracted to certain substrates, such as soil.

These can be tempting to use as a toilet. Remove any plant pots from the porch so that cats don’t have this option for where they urinate. Eliminate spaces that are cozy and inviting for cats to visit. These might include a chair with a cushion on it, or a objects such as boxes and crates that a cat could shelter in. Don’t bother covering surfaces with tin foil or plastic. Some advice urges homeowners to put tin foil or plastic over areas they want to protect. Cats will likely continue spraying regardless, so these methods are generally unproductive.

However, one advantage to covering surfaces with plastic or tin foil is the ease of cleaning up after a cat urinates on these surfaces. If the culprit is your own cat, it’s likely that he’s marking his territory. This happens when the cat feels challenged or insecure for some reason. Most commonly, he feels a threat to his territory. The key to stopping this behavior is to help him to feel more secure. If you have a cat flap or another means of another cat entering the house, it is crucial to make sure no strays can get inside your house. Lock the cat flap and let your cat in and out on demand. Use a microchip activated cat flap that is programmed to respond only to your cat’s microchip. Use a feline pheromone diffuser. A diffuser gives off a synthetic version of the hormones released by a nursing mother cat that make the kittens feel safe and content. These are a handy way of reducing an individual’s stress levels. Ask your vet for a feline pheromone diffuser such as Feliway to help decrease your cat’s anxiety levels.